Wednesday, April 15, 2015

The Grace Of Incorruption





The Grace Of Incorruption

By Donald Sheehan

Paraclete Press, March 28, 2015


It's always a delight to find quality modern Orthodox books popping up on publishers' lists and I jumped at the chance to request a review copy of this.  I had read a few articles by and about Donald Sheehan which had piqued my interest and I knew this was a book I needed as well as wanted to read.

This collection of essays covers his writings on how his Orthodox faith has permeated every aspect of his life, including his career as an educator, as a professor of literature and as a man who loved poetry, a career which is reflected in his often lyrical prose.

He describes his early life, living in a family affected by the violence and alcohol-fuelled aggression of his father, and how it was only after his father's death and a visit to the grave accompanied by his own family, that he was able to fully make his peace with his father and receive the wholly unexpected gift of the constant Jesus prayer. The prayer, "Lord Jesus Christ, son of God, have mercy on me a sinner",  was his constant companion, leading him to a conversation with a Benedictine monk and thence to Orthodoxy. The rest of the book leaves the reader in absolutely no doubt that he found his heart's true home within that Orthodox faith.

An enormous range of topics are covered in these essays: from the obvious aspects of  Orthodoxy found in Dostoevsky's "The Brothers Karamazov", St Isaac the Syrian's depiction of the Chalcedonian use of the term "hypostasis", depression and asceticism to  the elements of Orthodoxy found in  Shakespeare, Salinger and modern poetry too. The relationship between Orthodox Christians and the natural world, the loving respect for animals which characterises so many of the great Saints and the bodily incorruptibility of some reposed souls are mentioned, and the second half of the book discusses Psalmody, especially Psalm 118, in great and enlightening depth.

I would not describe the book an easy read; it requires the reader to concentrate hard, to think, to ponder deeply and above all  to pray. For the reader keen to delve deep into the riches of the Orthodox tradition in the multi-faceted aspects of its glory, this will be a treasure, a source of joy, and a blessing to read.

















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