Friday, March 20, 2015

Gods of the Morning





Gods of the Morning
A Bird's Eye View of a Highland Year
By John Lister-Kaye
Published by Canongate Books
March 5th, 2015


This is the story of a year in the Scottish Highlands, at an idyllic place called Aigas, as told by the eminent naturalist and author, John Lister-Kaye. He may primarily be a naturalist, but there is a good deal of the poet-philosopher in Mr Lister-Kaye and he does not shy away from looking at how man's interaction with the environment can be less than successful or indeed catastrophic in some cases. His Field Studies centre studies all aspects of flora and fauna in the area and he combines extensive scientific knowledge with a warm appreciation for his subject and an obvious desire to inspire the same sort of enthusiasm in the reader.

I certainly feel he succeeds in this. His love for the  area and every aspect of its wildlife shines through in every sentence, and he does not just describe the more appealing and marketable denizens such as golden eagles; I was delighted to find an incredible chapter about spiders, for instance!   Even the small events, such as a bird flying into a glass window and dying can reveal all sorts of natural history information; the fact that it was a blackcap was sad, but then it transpires that he had not heard any blackcaps singing for several weeks, yet they were still obviously in the area prior to migrating. What makes them stop singing before they fly away for the winter? He writes about owls, the delights and hardships of owning dogs, tracking animals, filming wildlife, cooking and eating swans whose corpses he found, fox-watching, how wildlife fares in the harsh winter months, wildfires, raptors, gamekeepers, butterflies and so much more.

Some of my favourite parts are when he discusses incredible migratory feats by birds, how leaves change colour and then fall and the remarkable ability of his local wood mice to navigate the area around his home, recounted with humour and a degree of delightful amazement. He tries not to interfere with nature, no matter how red in tooth and claw it may be,  yet he found he could not leave a stranded Whooper swan to perish and made sure to take some corn every day for it to eat  until it regained strength to fly off again.

A book which is worth reading and re-reading.





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